FREE FROM FOOD EXPO

Vegan-friendly eggs? Just add water, say New Food

© New Food

A range of animal derivative free products were unveiled at this year’s Free From Foods Exposition in Barcelona, from Polish company New Food.

Vegan friendly, 100% plant-based egg and burger mixes can be used as replacements in recipes that require meat or eggs, says the brand.

The products are a “sustainable and more compassionate choice”, said the brand.

One packet of vEGGs includes enough powder to make the equivalent of 20 eggs, as well as measuring spoons, whereas a packet of Burger Mix can make five vegan burgers.

Both products are cholesterol-free as well as containing no trans- or saturated fats.

© New Food

The burger mix can be used for burgers, meatballs and dishes requiring minced meat, for example spaghetti Bolognese or chili.

Although vEGGs cannot be used to make fried, scrambled or poached eggs, the mix is used as a binding agent in cooking and baking.

Recipes for cakes, biscuits and casseroles which call for eggs to bind ingredients together are suitable for vEGGs to be used.

New Food say that by using vEGGs in these dishes, consumers can be more ethical and sustainable, without sacrificing the taste or texture.

The eggs work by mixing 5 ml of powder with 50 ml of water and letting the gooey, yellow-coloured mixture stand for three minutes. After this the eggs are ready to be used.

The burger mix is prepared in a similar way, mixing the powder with 300 ml of water and leaving to set for five minutes before forming and frying.

One 90g vegan burger contains 12 g of protein, 700 mg of Omega-3 and 7 g of fibre.

Combatting common challenges of free-from food, New Food’s products boast a long-shelf life and do not need to be refrigerated.

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