Taiyo introduces sweet-tasting dietary fibres

© iStock

Combining sweetness with fibre, is the aim of Taiyo’s new varieties of Sunfiber, an all-natural range of soluble dietary fibres which can also be used as a sweetener.

Taiyo presented the organic, non-GMO, 100% gluten-free range at Vitafoods earlier this month in Geneva.

Sunfiber is a dietary fiber and can be consumed between 3-30g per day to cover partly or completely the daily dietary fiber needs. 

Sweet-Sunfiber and Sunfiber-Matcha Honey combine sweetness and texture with prebiotic fibre to enable consumers to benefit from health boosts, whilst still being tooth-friendly, says the supplier.

Sunfiber-Matcha Honey also has a taste of green tea incorporated within it, and Matcha is known for its antioxidant activity.

The natural component of honey or sugar canes, isomalto-oligosaccharide, is extracted and added to give the fibre a sweet taste.

Isomalto-oligosaccharide is non-cariogenic and metabolises slower than normal sugar, thus reducing blood sugar spikes and decreasing the amount of insulin released in the body.

This means the product is suitable for diabetic patients and for weight management.

"Sunfiber can replace the sugar by volume and also supplies some slow release calories that send some satiety signal to the brain. As dietary fiber it supports the growth of a healthy microbiom, in comparison to sugar that supports the growth of some bad microorganisms such as yeasts," explained Dr Siebrecht, managing director of Taiyo.

"If Sunfiber is used as a sugar replacement the sweetness goes either down a little bit (which is not that bad) or the sweetness is replaced by addition of some sweet fiber such as Imosweet or some stevia. Sunfiber also masks a little bit the bitter off-notes of some sweeteners".

As the fibres are highly water-soluble and remain stable at different temperatures and pH levels, they can be used in dairy, bakery, meats, beverages, ice creams and confectioneries.

"The applications are endless, especially because Sunfiber has no taste, no smell and does not change the mouthfeel or the viscosity of food products," said Siebrecht 

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